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Featured Speakers

Chris Aniszczyk
Chris Aniszczyk
Twitter

Chris Aniszczyk is a software architect by trade with a passion for open source and cultivating communities. At Twitter, he’s responsible for creating their open source program office and crafting their open source strategy. He also has the honor to sit on the Eclipse Foundation’s Board of Directors representing the committer community. In a previous life, he bootstrapped a consulting company, made many mistakes, hacked on many eclipse.org and linux related projects. He also fancies running long distances and prefers hitting the trails.

The Twitter Stack
TMonday October 21 - 10:10

Join Chris as he discusses how Twitter started on a monolithic architecture and eventually moved to a service oriented one solely relying on open source software along the way.

Mac Devine
Mac Devine
IBM Cloud Services
Mac has 24 years of experience with networking and virtualization. Mac started and served as the Chief Architect of the zCloud Innovation team, became the WebSphere CTO for Cloud Computing, and then CTO for Cloud Partnerships and Client Innovations within IBM Corporate Strategy. Mac's designs and innovations have seen him recognised as an IBM Master Inventor, an IBM Distinguished Engineer, and appointed as a member of IBM’s prestigious Academy of Technology. In his current role as Director of CloudFirst Innovation and CTO for the IBM Cloud Services Division Mac lead the technical due diligence for the SoftLayer acquisition and the creation of IBM’s new Cloud Services Division. Mac is a co-author of the Springer’s Handbook of Cloud Computing, and a graduate of Clemson University with a Masters of Science degree in Mathematical Sciences.
Gain the Competitive Edge with Next Generation Cloud Platforms
Tuesday October 22 - 09:30

The next generation of enterprise-class cloud platforms are inspiring confidence through innovative application development models, open infrastructures, DevOps, and attractive deployment options. However, platforms are also needed that provide extreme data security, facilitate collaboration across the ecosystem, and real time multi point data access. Audience will hear about how the next generation of cloud platforms can be a catalyst for service model transformation and business innovation.

Mark Hinkle
Mark Hinkle
Citrix

Mark Hinkle is the Senior Director, Open Source Solutions  at Citrix Systems Inc. He joined Citrix as a result of their July 2011 acquisition of Cloud.com where he was their Vice President of Community. He is currently responsible for Citrix open source efforts around the open source cloud computing platform, Apache CloudStack and the Xen Hypervisor. Previously he was the VP of Community at Zenoss Inc., a producer of the open source application, server, and network management software, where he grew the Zenoss Core project to over 100,000 users and 20,000 organizations on all seven continents. He also is a longtime open source expert and author having served as Editor-in-Chief for both LinuxWorld Magazine and Enterprise Open Source Magazine. Mr. Hinkle is also the author of the book, “Windows to Linux Business Desktop Migration.” (Thomson, 2006). He is a contributor to NetworkWorld’s Open Source Subnet and his personal blog on open source, technology, and new media can be found at www.socializedsoftware.com. You can follow him on twitter @mrhinkle. - See more at: http://socializedsoftware.com/presentations/#sthash.3scdIVCS.dpuf

We Won. What’s Next?
Monday October 21 - 9:50

It’s been over twenty years since Linux birth and it grown up to become the most successful collaborative endeavor of all time. Linus’ little project now cumulatively powers more servers, mobile phones and other embedded systems than any other operating system. Linux runs our economy and touches the lives of literally every single human being on the planet in one way, shape or form. Time Magazine named Linux Torvalds the 17th most influential man of the century 20th century. No longer do we have to defend the viability of Linux it’s been proven beyond a shadow of a doubt. So where do we go from here? We’ll explore how the Linux and open source community can build upon their success for the betterment of technology and the world around them.

Dirk Hohndel
Dirk Hohndel
Intel

Dirk Hohndel has been an active developer and contributor in the Linux space since its earliest days. Among other roles, he worked as Chief Technology Officer of SuSE and as Vice President of The XFree86 Project, Inc. Dirk joined Intel in 2001. He works in the Software and Services Group and focuses on the technology direction of Intel's Open Source Technology Center and guides Intel's engagements in open source. He is an active contributor in many open source projects and organizations, various program committees and advisory boards. Dirk holds a Diploma in Mathematics and Computer Science from the University of Würzburg, Germany. He lives in Portland, OR. Dirk has spoken at a large number of events, including a number of Linux Foundation events, both in the US and Japan.

Linux: Where Are We Going?
Wednesday, October 23 - 09:30

Linux creator Linus Torvalds will take the stage with Intel’s Chief Linux and Open Source Technologies Dirk Hohndel to discuss the latest technical advancements in the kernel.

Duncan Johnston-Watt
Duncan Johnston-Watt
CloudSoft Corporation

Duncan Johnston-Watt  is a serial entrepreneur and industry visionary with over twenty years experience in the software industry. Immediately prior to founding Cloudsoft Duncan was CTO at Enigmatec Corporation, the enterprise data center automation company he founded in 2001. A Computerworld Smithsonian Laureate for his pioneering work introducing Java Enterprise to financial services, Duncan holds an MSc in Computation from Oxford University and a BA in Mathematics and Philosophy from Leeds University.

Gain the Competitive Edge with Next Generation Cloud Platforms (Panel)
Tuesday October 22 - 09:50
Yannick Pellet
Yannick Pellet
Samsung Research America

Yannick Pellet is the Vice President of the Advanced Software Platform group at Samsung Research America (Silicon Valley). Prior to Samsung, Yannick worked for Hewlett-Packard where he headed the software development function and developer relations for webOS and later on the OpenWebOS open source project. Earlier, he was member of the original group of engineers that designed and implemented Maemo – one of the first Linux-based open source based mobile platform. He also participated in the creation of MeeGo (predecessor of Tizen), and was a member of the Nokia MeeGo leadership team. He delivered over half a dozen mobile products among which the critically acclaimed Linux based N9 and N900.

Fueling Samsung R&D Innovation with Collaborative Open Source Development
Tuesday, October 22 - 10:20

The mission of Samsung’s Advanced Software Platform Lab’s in Silicon Valley is to create differentiating software that will drive the evolution of future platforms. As such it stands at the cross-road of open source, industry and academic research, and symbolizes Samsung’s new and open way to engage in research activities. How does one find the sweat spot across industry, open source and academic R&D? What are the challenges? What are the benefits for the community? Where does the opportunity lie and how to materialize it? In this talk, Yannick Pellet (VP, Advanced Software Platform Lab) will provide a discussion on the concrete steps that were taken into this direction with few examples of how this collaboration model is working out.

Linus Torvalds
Linus Torvalds
The Linux Foundation

Linus Torvalds created the Linux kernel and oversaw open source development of the widely-used Linux operating system. Torvalds was born on December 28, 1969 in Helsinki, Finland. Torvalds enrolled at the University of Helsinki in 1988, graduating with a master's degree in computer science. His M.Sc. thesis was titled Linux: A Portable Operating System. An avid computer programmer, Linus authored many gaming applications in his early years. After purchasing a personal computer with an Intel 386 CPU, he began using Minix, an Unix-inspired operating system created by Andrew Tanenbaum for use as a teaching tool. Torvalds started work on a new kernel, later to be named "Linux", in the fall of 1991 and after forming a team of volunteers to work on this new kernel, released V1.0 in the spring of 1994. In 1996, Torvalds accepted an invitation to visit the California headquarters of Transmeta, a start-up company in the first stages of designing an energy saving central processing unit (CPU). Torvalds then accepted a position at Transmeta and moved to California with his family. Along with his work for Transmeta, Torvalds continued to oversee kernel development for Linux. In 2003, Torvalds left Transmeta to focus exclusively on the Linux kernel, backed by the Open Source Development Labs (OSDL), a consortium formed by high-tech companies, which included IBM, Hewlett-Packard, Intel, AMD, RedHat, Novell and many others. The purpose of the consortium was to promote Linux development. OSDL merged with The Free Standards Group in January 2007 to become The Linux Foundation. Torvalds remains the ultimate authority on what new code is incorporated into the standard Linux kernel.

Linux: Where Are We Going?
Wednesday, October 23 - 09:30

Linux creator Linus Torvalds will take the stage with Intel’s Chief Linux and Open Source Technologies Dirk Hohndel to discuss the latest technical advancements in the kernel.

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