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Featured Speakers

Brian Aker
Brian Aker
HP

Brian Aker is currently a Fellow at HP, working on Cloud Services. Prior to joining HP, he was a Distinguished Engineer at Sun Microsystems, where he instigated the Drizzle Database project and accelerated the development of Gearman and Memcached. He was the Director of Engineering at MySQL AB, where he helped pioneer distributed software development and corporate open source. He continues to maintain several open source projects, including Gearman, Drizzle, and libmemcached. He is an O’Reilly author, and is a frequent public speaker at technical events.

Why Open Matters: HP and OpenStack
Jonathan Bryce
Jonathan Bryce
OpenStack

Jonathan Bryce, who has spent his career building the cloud, is Executive Director of the OpenStack Foundation. Previously he was a founder of The Rackspace Cloud.

He started his career working as a web developer for Rackspace, and during his tenure, he and co-worker Todd Morey had a vision to build a sophisticated web hosting environment where users and businesses alike could turn to design, develop and deploy their ideal web site – all without being responsible for procuring the technology, installing it or making sure it is built to be always available. This vision became The Rackspace Cloud. Since then he has been a major driver of OpenStack, the open source cloud software initiative.

Developers - The New Superpower
Candy Chang
Candy Chang
TED Senior Fellow and Artist

Candy Chang is an artist, designer, and urban planner who explores making cities more comfortable and contemplative places. She believes in the potential of introspection and collective wisdom in public space to improve our communities and help us lead better lives. Recent projects include Before I Die, where she transformed an abandoned house in her neighborhood in New Orleans into an interactive wall for people to share their hopes and dreams -- a project The Atlantic called “one of the most creative community projects ever.” Other projects include I Wish This Was, a street art project that invites people to voice what they want in vacant storefronts, and Neighborland, an online tool that helps people self-organize and shape the development of their communities. She is a TED Senior Fellow, an Urban Innovation Fellow, and was named a “Live Your Best Life” Local Hero by Oprah magazine. By combining street art with urban planning and social activism, she has been recognized as a leader in developing new strategies for the design of our cities. She is co-founder of Civic Center, an art and design studio in New Orleans. See more at candychang.com.

Before I Die
Jon Corbet
Jon Corbet
LWN.net

Jonathan Corbet is a Linux kernel contributor, co-founder of LWN.net (and the author of its Kernel Page), and the lead author of Linux Device Drivers, Third Edition. He lives in Boulder, Colorado.

Linux Kernel Developer Panel
Chris DiBona
Chris DiBona
Google

Chris DiBona is the Director of Open Source for Mountain View, Ca. based Google. His teams oversees license compliance and support the open source developer community through programs such as the Google Summer of Code and through the release of open source software projects and patches. In the public sector space, he looks after Google Moderator and Google Elections.

Mr. DiBona is an internationally known advocate of open source software and related methodologies. He occasionally appears on the This Week in Tech  and the This Week in Google podcasts. He is a visiting scholar at the MIT Sloan School of Management and has a masters in software engineering from Carnegie Mellon University. Additionally, he serves on a number of technical advisory boards. 

Before joining Google, Mr. DiBona was an editor and author for the website Slashdot.org . Additionally, he coedited the award-winning essay compilations "Open Sources" and "Open Sources 2.0" and writes for several publications. He was the host of Floss Weekly with Leo Laporte and made a number of appearances on TechTV's "The Screensavers" and on the Cranky Geeks

What Five Years of Android Has Meant
Dirk Hohndel
Dirk Hohndel
Intel

Dirk Hohndel has been an active developer and contributor in the Linux space since its earliest days. Among other roles, he worked as Chief Technology Officer of SuSE and as Vice President of The XFree86 Project, Inc. Dirk joined Intel in 2001. He works in the Software and Services Group and focuses on the technology direction of Intel's Open Source Technology Center and guides Intel's engagements in open source. He is an active contributor in many open source projects and organizations, various program committees and advisory boards. Dirk holds a Diploma in Mathematics and Computer Science from the University of Würzburg, Germany. He lives in Portland, OR. Dirk has spoken at a large number of events, including a number of Linux Foundation events, both in the US and Japan.

The New Frontiers

Join Dirk Hohndel as he discusses where he sees the new challenges and opportunities in open source. It seems times have never been as exciting as right now, with the open source community pushing ahead everywhere from servers to clients to mobile. Dirk will draw from his more than 20 years’ experience as an open source developer to highlight some of the areas where he thinks we will see massive innovation and interesting opportunities.

Kevin Kelly
Kevin Kelly
Wired Magazine

Kevin Kelly is Senior Maverick at Wired Magazine and author of What Technology Wants (Viking, 2010). He helped launch Wired in 1993, and served as its Executive Editor until January 1999. He is currently editor and publisher of the Cool Tools website, which gets one million visitors per month. From 1984-1990 Kelly was publisher and editor of the Whole Earth Review, a journal of unorthodox technical news. He co-founded the ongoing Hackers’ Conference, and was involved with the launch of the WELL, a pioneering online service started in 1985. He authored the best-selling New Rules for the New Economy, and the classic book on decentralized emergent systems, Out of Control.

The Technium

What comes after the Internet? What is bigger than the web? What will produce more wealth than all the startups to date? The answer is a planetary super-organism comprised of 4 billion mobile phones, 80 quintillion transistor chips, a million miles of fiber optic cables, and 6 billion human minds all wired together. The whole thing acts like a single organism, with its own behavior and character -- but at a scale we have little experience with. This is more than just a metaphor. In this presentation, Kevin takes the idea of a global super-organism seriously by describing what we know about it so far, how it is growing, where its boundaries are, and what it will mean for us as individuals and collectively. Both the smallest one-person enterprises today, and the largest mega-corporations on Earth, will have to learn to how this Technium operates, and how to exploit it.

Gabe Newell
Gabe Newell
Valve

Gabe Newell is the co-founder and managing director of video game development and online distribution company Valve Corporation.

Linux and Gaming
Sarah Sharp
Sarah Sharp
Intel

Sarah Sharp is a Linux Kernel hacker at Intel’s Open Source Technology Center. In her spare time, she volunteers for the Portland State Aerospace Society, an open source/open hardware group that builds amateur rockets. Sarah is also a member of Portland’s Code ’N Splode group. Sarah has used git in many projects for two years: her wedding wiki, blog, Linux kernel projects, and keeping track of her home directory.

Linux Kernel Developer Panel
Linus Torvalds
Linus Torvalds
The Linux Foundation

Linus Torvalds created the Linux kernel and oversaw open source development of the widely-used Linux operating system. Torvalds was born on December 28, 1969 in Helsinki, Finland. Torvalds enrolled at the University of Helsinki in 1988, graduating with a master's degree in computer science. His M.Sc. thesis was titled Linux: A Portable Operating System. An avid computer programmer, Linus authored many gaming applications in his early years. After purchasing a personal computer with an Intel 386 CPU, he began using Minix, an Unix-inspired operating system created by Andrew Tanenbaum for use as a teaching tool. Torvalds started work on a new kernel, later to be named "Linux", in the fall of 1991 and after forming a team of volunteers to work on this new kernel, released V1.0 in the spring of 1994. In 1996, Torvalds accepted an invitation to visit the California headquarters of Transmeta, a start-up company in the first stages of designing an energy saving central processing unit (CPU). Torvalds then accepted a position at Transmeta and moved to California with his family. Along with his work for Transmeta, Torvalds continued to oversee kernel development for Linux. In 2003, Torvalds left Transmeta to focus exclusively on the Linux kernel, backed by the Open Source Development Labs (OSDL), a consortium formed by high-tech companies, which included IBM, Hewlett-Packard, Intel, AMD, RedHat, Novell and many others. The purpose of the consortium was to promote Linux development. OSDL merged with The Free Standards Group in January 2007 to become The Linux Foundation. Torvalds remains the ultimate authority on what new code is incorporated into the standard Linux kernel.

Linux Kernel Developer Panel
Eben Upton
Eben Upton
Raspberry Pi

Eben is a founder of the Raspberry Pi Foundation, and serves as its Executive Director. In an earlier life, he founded two successful mobile games and middleware companies, Ideaworks 3d Ltd and Podfun Ltd, held the post of Director of Studies for Computer Science at St John's College, Cambridge, and was co-author of The Oxford Rhyming Dictionary along with his father. He holds a BA in Physics and Engineering, a PhD in Computer Science, and an Executive MBA, from the University of Cambridge.

Update on Raspberry Pi
Jim Zemlin
Jim Zemlin
The Linux Foundation

Zemlin’s career spans three of the largest technology trends to rise over the last decade: mobile computing, cloud computing and open source software. Today, as executive director of The Linux Foundation, he uses this experience to accelerate the adoption of Linux and support the future of computing.

Zemlin’s career took root at Western Wireless, which had a successful IPO and was later acquired by Deutsche Telekom and renamed T-Mobile USA. He was also a member of the founding management team of Corio, a leading enterprise application service provider that had a successful IPO in July 2000. Other posts have included vice president of marketing at Covalent Technologies and executive director at Free Standards Group.

In his leadership role today at The Linux Foundation, Zemlin works with the world’s largest technology companies, including IBM, Intel, Google, Samsung, Qualcomm, and others to help define the future of computing on the server, in the cloud and on a variety of new mobile computing devices. His work at the vendor-neutral Linux Foundation gives him a unique and aggregate perspective on the global technology industry.

Zemlin has been recognized as a top Linux and open source blogger and is widely quoted in the press on Linux and the changing economics of the technology industry. His writing has appeared in Businessweek, Wired, and other top technology journals. He is a regular keynote speaker at industry events such as the Atlantic Big Science Summit, OSCON, LinuxCon, Gartner Group Forums, and TEDx, among others. Zemlin advises a variety of startups, including Splashtop, and sits on the boards of the Global Economic Symposium, Open Source For America and Chinese Open Source Promotion Union. Read Zemlin's weblog.

State of the Linux Union
Brad McCredie
Brad McCredie
IBM

Brad received his BS, MS, and PhD in electrical and computer engineering from the University of Illinois in ’85, ’87 and ’91 respectively. His primary interests were electromagnetic modeling and simulation. Brad joined IBM East Fishlkill in September of 1991 and continued his work on electromagnetic design and electronic packaging for IBM’s mainframe systems. In ’96 he moved to IBM Austin and began working on POWER systems. In Austin, Brad designed the packaging and cache subsystem for the POWER3 processor.  Brad then became one of the lead Architects of IBM’s POWER4 systems and chip. Brad went on to become the POWER4 system chief engineer and delivered that system in 2001. After delivering the POWER4 systems, Brad led the design and delivery of the POWER6 processor for IBM. After delivering POWER6 chip designs, Brad focused on POWER7 systems. His responsibilities included delivery of all system components including hardware and software elements. In 2004 Brad was appointed to the position of IBM Fellow. In 2009 Brad was appointed to the position of IBM Vice President and Fellow and leading POWER processor and chipset development. In 2012 Brad was appointed to the position of CTO for STG.

Linux, Cloud, and Next Generation Workloads

Brad McCredie, the visionary behind OpenPOWER, shares insights into the future of Linux-based cloud technologies.

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