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Keynote Speakers

Anant Agarwal
Anant Agarwal
edX

Anant Agarwal is the CEO of edX, an online learning destination founded by Harvard and MIT. Anant taught the first edX course oncircuits and electronics from MIT, which drew 155,000 students from 162 countries. He has served as the director of CSAIL, MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, and is a professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT. He is a successful serial entrepreneur, having co-founded several companies including Tilera Corporation, which created the Tile multicore processor, and Virtual Machine Works. Anant won the Maurice Wilkes prize for computer architecture, and MIT's Smullin and Jamieson prizes for teaching. He holds a Guinness World Record for the largest microphone array, and is an author of the textbook "Foundations of Analog and Digital Electronic Circuits." Scientific American selected his work on organic computing as one of 10 World- Changing Ideas in 2011, and he was named in Forbes' list of top 15 education innovators in 2012. Anant, a pioneer in computer architecture, is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a fellow of the ACM. He hacks on WebSim, an online circuits laboratory, in his spare time. Anant holds a Ph.D. from Stanford and a bachelor's from IIT Madras. Anant's twitter handle is @agarwaledu.

Reinventing Education Through Massive Open Online Courses
Doug Balog
Doug Balog
IBM

Douglas (Doug) Balog is the general manager for IBM Power Systems.   In that capacity, he is responsible for all facets of the Power Systems' business including strategy, architecture, operations, technology development and overall financial performance. Mr. Balog is also a member of IBM’s Performance and Strategy Teams, which focus respectively on tactical execution and the strategic direction for the IBM Corporation.   

Mr. Balog has been part of IBM’s Systems and Technology group for 30 years holding various product development leadership and brand leadership roles across System z, System x, BladeCenter, System Storage and now Power Systems.  During that time, he has led major portfolio transformations across all of these brands to better align with clients’ needs and market shifts. 

Prior to his current role, Mr. Balog was general manager for IBM System z where he led the successful launch of the zEnterprise EC12 in 3Q12; this included the repositioning of System z as the foundation for operational analytics, cloud and ultimate security.  From August 2009 to April 2012, Mr. Balog was the business line executive for IBM System Storage growing the company's storage portfolio through organic development, acquisitions and new partnerships.   

Mr. Balog graduated from Pennsylvania State University with a B.S. in Computer Science in 1983 and immediately joined IBM in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., working on the architectural validation of IBM’s next-generation mainframes.   He spent 18 years in N.Y. in a variety of development, brand and corporate roles until 2001 when he moved to San Francisco to help one of IBM’s largest clients deploy and operate one of the largest IBM mainframe- and Unix-based data centers for web trading at the time.   

Revolutionize the Way IT is Created and Consumed
Eileen Evans
Eileen Evans
Hewlett-Packard Company

Eileen Evans is the Vice President and Deputy General Counsel of Cloud Computing and Open Source for Hewlett-Packard Company. In her role, Eileen leads and manages legal support for cloud computing and open source at HP. Eileen also leads open source legal strategy and open source program management for HP. In her role, Eileen is representing HP on the OpenStack Foundation Board of Directors and is actively participating in other cloud-related open source communities.

Prior to joining HP in 2010, Eileen was a Director and Associate General Counsel at Sun Microsystems (and then Oracle Corporation following its acquisition of Sun) for nearly 12 years. At Sun, Eileen led and managed legal support for various hardware and software business units. Eileen also served as a lead Open Source Legal Strategist for Sun, where she led, managed and supported numerous open source projects, including Java, MySQL, OpenSolaris, OpenOffice and NetBeans. In addition to her open source experience at Sun and HP, Eileen has spoken on various intellectual property and open source topics at conferences in the United States and in Europe and with the European Commission and Members of the European Union Parliament.

The New Open Source Professional
Solomon Hykes
Solomon Hykes
Docker

Solomon Hykes is the founder of Docker (formerly dotCloud), and the creator of the Docker open source initiative. A Forbes 30 under 30 and YCombinator alumni, Solomon led dotCloud as CEO through 5 years of fundraising, business operations and product launches before focusing entirely on Docker.

Creating Lightweight, Portable, Self-Sufficient Containers From Any Application
Jonathan Kuniholm
Jonathan Kuniholm
Open Prosthetics Project

Jon is the President of the Open Prosthetics Project.

Open Sourcing Prosthetics Design
Anthony Moschella
Anthony Moschella
MakerBot

Anthony Moschella is vice president of Product at MakerBot, where he works with MakerBot’s team of engineers to design tools for the manufacturers and creators of tomorrow. A passionate engineer, hacker, maker, teacher, and 3D printing advocate, Anthony works to help bring the disruptive technology of desktop 3D printing to the masses. In addition to his enthusiasm about the power of personal fabrication, Anthony brings more than a decade of consumer product design experience. Before MakerBot, Anthony developed ultra-low power wireless sensors, high performance automotive simulation tools, and embedded robotic systems. He holds multiple patents and has written for a number of technical publications in several industries. Anthony holds holds a ScB in Electrical Engineering from Brown University and MS in Computer Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. MakerBot, a subsidiary of Stratasys, Ltd., is leading the Next Industrial Revolution by setting the standards in reliable and affordable desktop 3D printing. Founded in 2009, MakerBot has built the largest installed base of desktop 3D printers sold to innovative and industry-leading customers worldwide, including engineers, architects, designers, educators and consumers. MakerBot’s 3D Ecosystem drives accessibility and rapid adoption of 3D printing and includes: Thingiverse.com, the MakerBot Digitizer Desktop 3D Scanner, the MakerBot Replicator line of Desktop 3D Printers, MakerWare software, MakerCare, the MakerBot retail store, and strategic partnerships with top-tier brands. MakerBot has been honored with many accolades, including Popular Mechanics’ “Overall Winner” for best 3D printer, Time Magazine’s “Best Inventions of 2012,” Popular Mechanics’ “Editor’s Choice Award,” Popular Science’s “Product of the Year,” Fast Company’s “One of the World’s Top 10 Most Innovative Companies in Consumer Electronics,” and many more. Join the Next Industrial Revolution by following MakerBot at makerbot.com.

Sharing Open Source Designs For 3D Printing
Jay Rogers
Jay Rogers
Local Motors

John “Jay” Rogers is President, CEO, and Co-Founder of Local Motors, a next-generation car company that is changing the way cars are designed, built, and owned. Founded less than 4 years ago, Local Motors is home to over 60,000 car design concepts, 17,000 community members, 30 full time employees, 1 production vehicle, the Rally Fighter, and one vehicle co-created for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). Local Motors is the first automotive co-creation community, and the first company to produce an open source vehicle.

Jay Rogers grew up a lover of cars and a student of the industry; his grandfather owned the legendary Indian Motorcycle Company and was the first Cummins Engine Distributor in the United States. His rides have included a 1991 BMW 535, 1971 Mercedes 300SL, a 1996 Dodge Viper R/T10, 1994 Chevrolet 1500 with hydraulic dump-bed, a 2002 Honda Element, and now he drives a 1971 Mercedes 280SL and a Rally Fighter. His family and passion inspired a most ambitious plan: Exciting, efficient vehicles designed through open source then built locally in a sustainable manner with customer participation.

Vehicle Development Through Open Collaboration
Imad Sousou
Imad Sousou
Intel

Imad Sousou is vice president of the Software and Services Group and general manager of the Intel Open Source Technology Center at Intel Corporation. As general manager of the center since its creation in 2003, Sousou is responsible for Intel's efforts in open source software across a range of technologies and market segments, including enterprise Linux and related technologies, embedded market segments, and client Linux programs and related technologies. The center also focuses on operating system (OS) stacks, including the Tizen OS, Android on Intel architecture and the Chrome OS for Intel architecture, and on open source applications, user experience and Web and HTML5 technologies on top of client operating systems. Sousou joined Intel in 1994 as a senior software engineer. Before moving into his current role, he served as director of telecom software programs in the Intel Communications Group and as director of client software engineering in the Home Products Group. He began his career as a software engineer at Central Point Software working on system utilities for the Apple Mac OS. Intel has honored Sousou twice with the Intel Achievement Award; in 2007 for his role in the agreement with Sun Microsystems on Open Solaris, and in 2011 for leadership through open source solutions. Sousou holds a bachelor's degree in computer science and mathematics from Portland State University. He is on the board of directors at the OpenStack Foundation.

Linux in the New Connected World
Linus Torvalds
Linus Torvalds
The Linux Foundation

Linus Torvalds created the Linux kernel and oversaw open source development of the widely-used Linux operating system.

Torvalds was born on December 28, 1969 in Helsinki, Finland. Torvalds enrolled at the University of Helsinki in 1988, graduating with a master's degree in computer science. His M.Sc. thesis was titled Linux: A Portable Operating System.

An avid computer programmer, Linus authored many gaming applications in his early years. After purchasing a personal computer with an Intel 386 CPU, he began using Minix, an Unix-inspired operating system created by Andrew Tanenbaum for use as a teaching tool. Torvalds started work on a new kernel, later to be named "Linux", in the fall of 1991 and after forming a team of volunteers to work on this new kernel, released V1.0 in the spring of 1994.

In 1996, Torvalds accepted an invitation to visit the California headquarters of Transmeta, a start-up company in the first stages of designing an energy saving central processing unit (CPU). Torvalds then accepted a position at Transmeta and moved to California with his family. Along with his work for Transmeta, Torvalds continued to oversee kernel development for Linux.

In 2003, Torvalds left Transmeta to focus exclusively on the Linux kernel, backed by the Open Source Development Labs (OSDL), a consortium formed by high-tech companies, which included IBM, Hewlett-Packard, Intel, AMD, RedHat, Novell and many others. The purpose of the consortium was to promote Linux development. OSDL merged with The Free Standards Group in January 2007 to become The Linux Foundation. Torvalds remains the ultimate authority on what new code is incorporated into the standard Linux kernel.

Linux Kernel Developer Panel
Jim Zemlin
Jim Zemlin
The Linux Foundation

Zemlin’s career spans three of the largest technology trends to rise over the last decade: mobile computing, cloud computing and open source software. Today, as executive director of The Linux Foundation, he uses this experience to accelerate the adoption of Linux and support the future of computing.

Zemlin’s career took root at Western Wireless, which had a successful IPO and was later acquired by Deutsche Telekom and renamed T-Mobile USA. He was also a member of the founding management team of Corio, a leading enterprise application service provider that had a successful IPO in July 2000. Other posts have included vice president of marketing at Covalent Technologies and executive director at Free Standards Group.

In his leadership role today at The Linux Foundation, Zemlin works with the world’s largest technology companies, including IBM, Intel, Google, Samsung, Qualcomm, and others to help define the future of computing on the server, in the cloud and on a variety of new mobile computing devices. His work at the vendor-neutral Linux Foundation gives him a unique and aggregate perspective on the global technology industry.

Zemlin has been recognized as a top Linux and open source blogger and is widely quoted in the press on Linux and the changing economics of the technology industry. His writing has appeared in Businessweek, Wired, and other top technology journals. He is a regular keynote speaker at industry events such as the Atlantic Big Science Summit, OSCON, LinuxCon, Gartner Group Forums, and TEDx, among others. Zemlin advises a variety of startups, including Splashtop, and sits on the boards of the Global Economic Symposium, Open Source For America and Chinese Open Source Promotion Union. Read Zemlin's weblog.

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